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German events at Agnes Scott, German Film, German History

German Film Series Starts with “Murderers Are Among Us”, 1946

This year’s German film series will begin tonight, Monday, January 28, 7-9pm, in Buttrick Hall G-4, with a screening of The Murderers Are Among Us (1946). The screening is open to the ASC community and the film is subtitled. You can download the entire program of the filmseries here.

Still from “Die Mörder sind unter uns.” (http://www.duits.de/lexikon/afb/moerder-sind-unter-uns.jpg)

Wolfgang Staudte’s 1946 release Die Mörder sind unter uns [The Murderers Are Among Us] was the first German film produced after the end of World War II. The film tells the story of Hans Mertens, a traumatized ex-soldier and doctor, who returns to rubble-strewn Germany unable to get over his participation in an ordered execution of civilians on the Eastern front. When he coincidentally finds out that the former commander who ordered the executions has repositioned himself as an orderly citizen and successful business owner, Mertens hatches a plan to kill him.

Die Mörder sind unter uns has become a classic not only because it asks hard questions about what to do with the Nazi-perpetrators, but also because it offers impressive vistas of the destroyed urban landscapes in postwar Germany. The film also started the career of actress Hildegard Knef.

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About GG

Gundolf Graml is Associate Prof. and Dir. of German Studies at Agnes Scott College. He has a Ph.D. in German Studies from the University of Minnesota and has published articles on German and Austrian film and tourism. He is currently writing a book about tourism and Austrian national identity after 1945. Other research projects include critical whiteness studies and, most recently, investigations into the connection between memory and nature. At ASC, Gundolf Graml teaches courses on a broad range of topics, from German 101 to German and Austrian Cinema and Afro-German History and Culture.

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