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Curriculum, Environment, General, German events at Agnes Scott, Immigration, Lectures, Sustainability

When Early German Settlers met Native Americans

Please join us for Prof. Katie Faull’s lecture, Stories of the Susquehanna, on Monday, March 28, 2016, 3:30-4:30pm, in Bullock Science Center/Teasley Lecture Hall (open to the public).

Prof. Faull has received several large NEH grants to translate and digitize documents from the Moravian archives in Bethlehem, PA. The Moravian community was founded by 18th-century German-speaking immigrants who in turn descended from Protestant communities in today’s Czech Republic.

The Stories of the Susquehanna project examines how these early settlers interacted with Native American communities, with the environment in the upper branches of the Susquehanna river, and forms a showcase project for digital undergraduate research. The lecture is open to the public, please direct any questions to ggraml@agnesscott.edu.

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About GG

Gundolf Graml is Associate Prof. and Dir. of German Studies at Agnes Scott College. He has a Ph.D. in German Studies from the University of Minnesota and has published articles on German and Austrian film and tourism. He is currently writing a book about tourism and Austrian national identity after 1945. Other research projects include critical whiteness studies and, most recently, investigations into the connection between memory and nature. At ASC, Gundolf Graml teaches courses on a broad range of topics, from German 101 to German and Austrian Cinema and Afro-German History and Culture.

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